Psalm 9 Meaning - Verse by Verse Explanation from Bible

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Discover Psalm 9 Commentary in detail, with their Bible study and explained, as well as their meaning in the Catholic Bible among others.

Psalm 9-1

I will praise you, O Lord, with all my heart;
I will tell all your wonders.

Psalm 9-2

I will be glad and rejoice in you;
I will sing to your name, O Most High.

Psalm 9-3

When my enemies retreat, they
will fall and perish before you.

Psalm 9-4

Because you have upheld my judgment and my cause;
You have sat on the throne judging righteously.

Psalm 9-5

You rebuked the nations, you destroyed the wicked, you
blotted out their name forever and ever.

Psalm 9-6

The enemy has come to an end in eternal desolation;
and you brought down their cities,
and their memory perished with them.

Psalm 9-7

But the Lord will endure forever;
He has prepared his throne for judgment.

Psalm 9-8

And he will judge the world with righteousness;
he will judge the peoples with equity.

Psalm 9-9

And the Lord will be a refuge for the oppressed, a
refuge for times of trouble.

Psalm 9-10

And those who know your name will trust in you;
for you, O Lord, will not forsake those who seek you.

Psalm 9-11

Sing praises to the Lord, who dwells in Zion;
proclaim his works among the peoples.

Psalm 9-12

For he who asks for an account of the blood remembers them;
he does not forget the cry of the afflicted.

Psalm 9-13

Have mercy on me, O Lord;
look at my affliction that those who hate me inflict on me;
you, who raise me from the gates of death,

Psalm 9-14

so that I may recount all your praises
in the gates of the daughter of Zion,
and rejoice in your salvation.

Psalm 9-15

The nations have sunk in the pit they made;



his foot was caught in the net that they hid.

Psalm 9-16

Jehovah has made himself known by his judgment;
the wicked is bound in the work of his hands. Higaion. Selah

Psalm 9-17

The wicked will be transferred to Sheol,
all the nations that forget God.

Psalm 9-18

For the needy will not be forgotten forever,
nor will the hope of the poor perish forever .

Psalm 9-19

Arise, O Lord; let not man prevail;
let the nations be judged before you.

Psalm 9-20

Put fear in them, O Lord;
let the nations know that they are but men. Selah

Psalm 9 Meaning

The meaning of Psalm 9 is very interesting, it reflects on victory and defeat. In this psalm it is narrated how David finds a glimmer of light in those situations where it seems like a defeat but he finds points to lean on that he finds favorable.

Psalm 9 Commentary

Praise and worship seem to be the ultimate elixir of life in many Christian gatherings. In fact, many people seriously think about changing their local church because supposedly their local church does not give due importance to praise and worship. But when you take a look at what they call praise and worship, all you find is an attractive spectacle that captures the listener’s attention by the rhythm of the music or by the gestures of the singers or by the stage arrangements.



Everything except the person of God or his beloved Son the Lord Jesus Christ. If you. want to know what genuine praise and worship is like, study the book of Psalms and I’m sure you will see something completely different there. What stands out is that praise and worship does not consist of the style of music or the talent of the musicians. The music with which the psalms were sung has not been preserved, because it was not important. The important thing was the lyrics of the hymns, the content of the songs. Today the opposite is happening. The important thing is the music and the talent of the musicians and the lyrics of the songs are secondary.

One of the psalms where what we are saying can be appreciated in a very clear way is in the first twelve verses of Psalm 9. This biblical passage, which will be analyzed today, exudes genuine praise and adoration to God, not to the music or singers. So let’s open our Bible to Psalm 9, verses 1 to 12.

The first thing we find is an overwriting with instructions for the lead musician.

It goes like this: “To the chief musician; on Mut-labén. A psalm of David.”

The word Mut-labén means death of the son. It seems to be the reference to some special kind of melody. The psalm was sung to the rhythm of that melody. We can also see that the author of this psalm is David.

Regarding the content of the Psalm, we basically find two sections. One could be called the expressed praise and the other could be called the explained praise.

Let’s consider the first section. The praise expressed.

Psalm 9: 1-2 says, “I will praise you, O Jehovah, with all my heart; I will tell of all your wonders. I will be glad and rejoice in you; I will sing to your name, O Most High.”

With four actions, David expresses his praise to Jehovah.

First:



I will praise you, O Jehovah, with all my heart. For the Jew, speaking from the heart was like speaking about his intellect, his faculty of reason, his ability to think. When David says that he praises Jehovah with all his heart, he is saying that all his intellect, all his thinking, all his reasoning is devoted to praising Jehovah. Isn’t that great? I must admit that many times, I am singing to the Lord with the hymnal in my hands and my eyes on the lyrics of the hymn, but my mind, my reasoning, my thought is who knows where.

Second:

I will tell all your wonders. In his praise, David used to verbally quote or say the wonderful deeds of God. This is what he means when he says: I will tell all your wonders. Do you usually say the wonders of God in your praise of God?

Third:

I will be glad and rejoice in you. David praised with a smile on his lips. I was really happy. I don’t know if you have had the experience of leading worship in a local church meeting. If you have, you will agree with me that from now on one can quite accurately appreciate the state of mind of people who praise the Lord. There are really few who like David rejoice and rejoice in God whom they are praising. The vast majority sing like automatons, or worse still, as if they are self-torture when they sing to the Lord. Their faces reflect such bitterness, such reluctance, that they look like a squeezed lemon. David was the opposite, he felt happy praising the Lord and it showed on his face. He was rejoicing.

Fourth:

I will sing to your name, O Most High. The praise of David was with songs directed to the name of God Most High. David didn’t want to draw people’s attention to himself or to his music. David strove to bring everyone’s attention to the person of God. He is the only one worthy of praise. How is your praise in light of what we have seen? I confess that I have a long way to go to be a true worshiper. But I am not discouraged. I want to strive to be better every day.



  • Once we’ve considered the praise expressed, let’s consider the praise explained. Why was David so willing to praise the Lord? Let me suggest two important reasons.
  1. Number one, because the enemies perished.

Psalm 9: 3-6 says, “My enemies turned back; they fell and perished before you. For you have upheld my right and my cause; you have sat on the throne judging righteously. You have rebuked the nations, you have destroyed the wicked, you have blotted out their names forever and ever; the enemies have perished; they have been desolate forever: and the cities that you struck down, their memory perished with them “

As a king, David had many friends and not a few enemies. It will always be so for people in positions of authority. Sometimes it seemed that the enemies prevailed, but David cried out to God and God answered his prayer by granting victory over the enemies. In His justice, God literally wiped David’s enemies off the map. This fact is what motivated David to praise God greatly. Perhaps you will not have enemies who want to kill you, but I am sure you will have other enemies in quotes. I think, for example, of things like pride, envy, bad thoughts, jealousy, anger, inferiority complex, fear, doubt, etc. Sometimes these enemies are menacing and powerful. Remember that God is ready to deliver you from any of these enemies and when He does, don’t forget to praise God with all your heart.

2. Number two, because Jehovah abides forever.

Psalm 9: 7-12 says: 


“But Jehovah will stand forever; he has ordained his throne for judgment. He will judge the world with righteousness, and the peoples with righteousness. Jehovah will be a refuge for the poor, a refuge for time of trouble. In you Those who know your name will trust, because you, O Lord, have not forsaken those who seek you. Sing to the Lord who dwells in Zion; publish his works among the peoples. For he who demands blood remembers them; forgot the cry of the afflicted “

The enemy, no matter how strong, is fleeting, but Jehovah remains forever. This is a great reason to praise the Lord with all your heart. As the eternal God, Jehovah is ready to judge the world with justice and the people with justice. Seeing the wickedness of this world, we often wonder if there will ever be someone who judges the wicked. The eternal God will judge them and the wicked will be condemned according to their evil deeds. As an eternal God, Jehovah will also be a refuge for the poor.

This is wonderful. The poor are normally despised, humiliated and abused by the powerful of this world, but with God things are different. The Bible says that God is a refuge for the poor, a refuge from time of trouble. The safety of a shelter depends on the quality of that shelter. Can there be someone of better quality than God? Consequently there is no safer refuge than God.

There is no reason to be afraid knowing that God is our refuge.

The safety of a shelter depends on the quality of that shelter. Can there be someone of better quality than God? Consequently there is no safer refuge than God. There is no reason to be afraid knowing that God is our refuge. The safety of a shelter depends on the quality of that shelter. Can there be someone of better quality than God? Consequently there is no safer refuge than God. There is no reason to be afraid knowing that God is our refuge.



Then the psalmist says that those who know God’s name or those who know for sure how powerful God is, can fully trust him. And then he presents a promise to all of us who trust in God. It says: You, O Jehovah, did not forsake those who sought you. No one who trusts in Jehovah’s name will become helpless or unprotected. This is the theme of David’s song. Sing to the Lord, he says, publish his works among the peoples. Jehovah is the avenger of the afflicted. Jehovah did not forget the cry of the afflicted.

Are you in distress right now? Don’t lose hope, my listener.

Get to know Jehovah personally through Jesus Christ his Son. Jehovah will then be their refuge. Cry out to Jehovah with all your heart and Jehovah will answer your cry and give just payment to those who have brought you affliction.

So ends this portion of Psalm 9. Yes, it is a song, it is praise and worship. Its content is rich in exalting God for who he is and what he does. It is not vain repetition of phrases that rhyme very well, but do not communicate anything, as is much of today’s praise and worship.

What is your first reaction when someone offends you?

Well, to be honest, you will have to admit that the first thing that comes to mind is revenge. On the subject of revenge, let me tell you this true story, which certainly made me laugh out loud.

At three in the morning the phone rings at Mr. González’s house. Scared and confused, he gets up, picks up the receiver and hears the voice of a man on the other end of the line saying: Hello, I’m your neighbor, Mr. Pérez, and I call to tell you that your dog is barking so much that it won’t let me sleep. Mr. González very kindly thanks his neighbor for calling and hangs up the phone. The next day, at exactly three in the morning, the phone rings, but this time at Mr. Pérez’s house. Frightened and confused, Mr. Pérez gets up to answer the call.



Pick up the receiver and hear the voice of a man on the other end of the line saying: Hi, I’m your neighbor, Mr. Gonzalez, and I’m calling to tell you that I don’t have a dog. This I would call revenge with a great sense of humor. Don’t you think? But even with a sense of humor, revenge is a negative. It is not wise in any way to take justice into our own hands. This is essentially what we learn from the second part of Psalm 9, which we will have the opportunity to study today. Mr. González, and I call to tell him that I don’t have any dogs.

This I would call revenge with a great sense of humor. Don’t you think?

But even with a sense of humor, revenge is a negative. It is not wise in any way to take justice into our own hands. This is essentially what we learn from the second part of Psalm 9, which we will have the opportunity to study today. Mr. González, and I call to tell him that I don’t have any dogs. This I would call revenge with a great sense of humor. Don’t you think? But even with a sense of humor, revenge is a negative. It is not wise in any way to take justice into our own hands.



This is essentially what we learn from the second part of Psalm 9, which we will have the opportunity to study today. revenge is a negative thing. It is not wise in any way to take justice into our own hands. This is essentially what we learn from the second part of Psalm 9, which we will have the opportunity to study today. revenge is a negative thing. It is not wise in any way to take justice into our own hands. This is essentially what we learn from the second part of Psalm 9, which we will have the opportunity to study today.

Ask yourself this question: Why is it not good to execute revenge? The biblical passage gives us four important reasons.

  • First, because God has promised to free the righteous.

Psalm 9: 13-14 says: “Have mercy on me, Jehovah; look at my affliction that I suffer because of those who hate me, You who raise me up from the gates of death, so that I may count all your praises in the gates of the daughter of Zion, and I rejoice in your salvation”

David, the author of the Psalm, must have been in great distress because of his adversaries. But instead of seeking revenge and paying them in kind, David sets his sights on Jehovah and asks him for mercy. David knew that he did not deserve better treatment at all, and he simply asks God not to give what he really deserves. This is mercy. Then he asks God to look at his affliction because of his adversaries. David knew that God would bring deliverance, even when the affliction was so intense that death seemed near.

Once freed from affliction David could testify of God’s power in deliverance and could join in the song of those who praise God for being delivered. All with one accord will rejoice in salvation. This is the attitude we should take when we are offended. Instead of looking at the enemy, we have to look at God. Instead of looking at the affliction that the enemy produces, we have to look at the comfort that comes from God. Instead of thinking about how to get revenge, we have to think that revenge is from God. This is what makes the difference.

Why should we not execute revenge?

  • Second, because God has promised to punish the wicked.

Psalm 9: 15-17 says: 


“The nations have sunk in the pit that they made; in the net that they hid their foot was taken. Jehovah has made himself known in the judgment that he executed; in the work of his hands the wicked was bound . Higaion. Selah. The wicked will be transferred to Sheol, all the people who forget God. “

God is a God of vengeance. The revenge that he executes is not sin, because he is holy, the revenge that we execute is sin, no matter how good we are. The Bible says in Romans 12:19: “Do not avenge yourselves, my beloved, but leave room for the wrath of God; for it is written: Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord”The wicked won’t get away with it, listening friend, but the judgment for the wicked won’t come from us but from God. It will be God who will cause the wicked to fall into the same hole that He made to trap the righteous.

It will be God who causes the wicked to be trapped in the same net that he made to trap the righteous It will be God who links the wicked as the hunter links his prey The end result will be that the wicked will be transferred to the grave, to Sheol, to the place from the dead to keep company with all the people who forget God. This is the anteroom,



As we can see, listening friend, the end that awaits the wicked is not at all pleasant. The wicked boast that they can do whatever they want and nothing happens. Well, for now nothing happens, but in God’s time, God’s judgment will come upon them and they will end up with their bones in the grave. It is God executing vengeance on the wicked. Everything is in God’s time. Our time is always ready. We like everything instantly, we like to receive everything we ask of God the moment we ask. We would like to see the wicked punished the very moment he does evil. But God has his time that is not the same time as ours.

It is necessary to wait for God’s timing.

Many of the things that God does need to be done in God’s time and if we try to advance time we spoil something beautiful that God is doing. That happened to Abraham when he wanted to get ahead of God’s time for the arrival of the son of promise.

When I was a child, my parents lived in a house with a large lot. There you could plant and raise animals. One day my mom laid a few eggs in a hen’s nest and the hen landed on them. After a few days, the chicks began to hatch. First there was a small hole in the shell where you could barely see the chick’s beak. In my curiosity I wanted to help the chick hatch and do you know what happened? I ended up killing the chick. It was not yet time for it to hatch. So it is with God’s vengeance. If we help God in quotes to execute vengeance, we will spoil what God wants to do. We should not worry about the apparent prosperity of the wicked, everything is temporary, in God’s time God’s vengeance will come upon them.

Why is it good for us to execute revenge by our own hand?

  • Third, because God has promised to remember the poor.

Psalm 9: 18 says, “For the needy will not be forgotten forever, nor will the hope of the poor perish forever.”



Why take revenge on those who oppress us if we know that soon God will reward us by freeing us from affliction? It seems that God has forgotten the poor, the afflicted, the needy, but there is no such. God says: The needy will not be forgotten forever. When God sees that the purpose of the affliction in a person has been fulfilled, that moment, God himself will take care of removing the motive that causes distress. Therefore, the needy, the poor, the afflicted must not lose hope. Liberation is on the way, victory is certain. The last word has not yet been said for the needy. God has not forgotten him.

Why is it not good to execute revenge?

  • Fourth, because God has promised to judge the nations.

Psalm 9: 19-20 says: “Arise, O Lord, let not man be strong; let the nations be judged before You, Put fear in them, O Lord; let the nations know that they are but men”

In the end, the only winner is God. So David cries out to Jehovah asking that his power be manifested to neutralize man. Then the nations will be judged before him. This will literally happen at the end of the Great Tribulation, when all the nations of the world will come together to be judged by Jesus Christ. The righteous will be rewarded with entry into the millennial kingdom and the wicked will be condemned by descending into the grave, to immediately begin to receive punishment for their wickedness. Jehovah’s vengeance on the nations will have been completed. In that judgment of the nations, at the end of the Great Tribulation, the nations will tremble in fear before Jesus Christ and will recognize how foolish they were to dare to raise their fists against him. That is why David says: Lord, let the nations know that they are but men.

Man is fragile and especially with a heart contaminated with sin. Because of his hardness of heart, man rebels against God and against the children of God. Someday you will recognize that it was absurd to be in rebellion against God.



Perhaps you listener friend, at this very moment you are suffering because of your adversaries. It may be that the idea of taking revenge against your enemies has crossed your mind. In the name of the Lord, I beg you not to. It is not good to execute revenge by your own hand. Like David, leave vengeance in God’s hand. He will carry it out in his own time and in his own way. God has promised to free the righteous, God has promised to punish the wicked, God has promised to remember the poor, God has promised to judge the nations.

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